Close Up Size Comparison Staple Free Coin Flip Cardboard

Peel-N-Seal Cardboard Coin Flip Review: No More Staples!

The Peel-N-Seal products are meant to replace traditional 2×2 cardboard flips. A regular cardboard flip requires staples to be secured, BCW created a brand of self-adhesive coin flips.

Here is the version I will be reviewing, the 2″x2″ flips for half dollars. These were purchased on Amazon.

How to Use Peel and Seal Coin Flips:

1.) Pick a coin in the right size to go in the flip.

BCW Self Adhesive Cardboard Flip for Half Dollars
1963 Franklin Half under a BCW Peel-N-Seal Flip

2.) Remove the sticker protecting the adhesive.

Peeling Adhesive
Peel up the adhesive. I have longer nails, so this was no problem.

3.) Center coin on one of the windows.

Center Coin on Flip
Center coin on one side of the flip. It is helpful to use a flat surface.

4.) Press firmly around all edges.

Press Firmly
Make sure to focus around the window, keeping the coin in the center.

5.) Finished!

1963 Franklin Half Dollar in cardboard flip
Tah-dah! Perfectly sized.

Benefits:

There are several benefits to using self-adhesive coin flips.

First, it is much easier and faster to use the self-adhesive coin flips than stapling. With a regular coin flip you have to use at least 2 staples to secure the coin.

Without staples, the flips can lay flat together! When you have many traditional coin flips, the staples prevent the cardboard from laying flat, so the flips do not look organized together.

Size comprison stacked BCW Staple Free Peel n Seal
Comparing sizes of stapled flips vs. staple free flips.

Another drawback of using staples is that the staples can damage the coin. Whether the staple is rubbing against the coin in it’s own cardboard flip, or stabbing a coin in the flip behind it, small scratches diminish a coin’s value.

One great thing is that there is more room for labeling. Coin collectors like cardboard flips because you can write the coins denomination, year, and mint mark on the cardboard so that it is easy to quickly catalogue coins. Without the pesky staples, coin collectors have more room for writing on the Peel-N-Seal flips.

Drawbacks:

One of the biggest drawbacks is the price, Press-n-Seal coin flips can be 50% to 100% more expensive than traditional coin flips. It is really up to you whether the time saved is worth the cost. If you go through many coin flips, the price could really add up.

I purchased 100 ‘Self Adhesive Peel-N-Seal’ coin flips for half dollars. If I was going to redo my purchase I would probably use these flips for pennies, nickels, or dimes. Since half-dollars are heavier, I am worried about the half dollars falling out of the flips, particularly when the adhesive begins to age.

The company, BCW, says on their website that they use archival polyester for the window, but no mention is made of the adhesive. In the long-term, the glue used to hold the cardboard together could potentially lead to toning on the coins.

Since BCW specializes in coin supplies, I assume they put thought into the type of adhesive used and how it could affect the coins, but it is not addressed on their website.

I saw several reviews online saying that some people found the adhesive was not working on half-dollar coin flips, but I have not found this to be the case. One reviewer mentioned having to use a lot of force to keep the coin in the holder and that was not my experience at all.

I pushed the coin in securely around the window to keep it in, but I did not have to fight with the coin to keep it down. Perhaps the company made changes to the design since that review was posted?

Out of the 6 BCW flips I have used so far, I had one that was misaligned. Removing the coin from the misaligned flip was more difficult than I expected. Here is a photo of the misaligned coin below, the obverse is centered, but the reverse is off.

I thought I would be able to peel the coin open from the adhesive layer, but after only a minute in the flip, it was glued tight, so I reverted to tearing it open. (You could use scissors if you are careful not to knick the coin.)

Tearing Flip Removing Coin From Cardboard Flip Adhesive
Tearing the flip open.

So this could definitely be a drawback. If you move coins out of flips often, it is much easier to use a regular coin flip and a staple remover. On the other-hand, I am much more confident in the quality of the adhesive after this!

Comparing BCW Peel and Seal to regular cardboard flips.

This is a really useful tool for coin storage. The BCW coin flips have much thinner cardboard, plus since they are staple-free, they lie much flatter.

Here is a comparison of a standard, stapled penny flip on the left with an adhesive cardboard flip on the left. The Press-N-Seal flip is about 30% thinner.

Comparison Thickness Standard Flip vs BCW Adhesive Flip
Standard Cardboard Flip vs a Self Adhesive

Using the image I used earlier, look at how the smaller width transfers to a much cleaner and more organized look than traditional staples.

Size comprison stacked BCW Staple Free Peel n Seal

Now, to be fair, I have been using regular paper staples on my coin flips. A reader pointed out that you can purchase staplers that staple flat. I asked for his flat stapler recommendation, and he recommended this one:

Final Thoughts:

I like these more than I expected to. These cardboard coin flips look very clean and organized and that is a big plus for me. I would prefer to use these with pennies, and coins that are less valuable to me.

Aligning the coins is a little frustrating, but I have the same problem with traditional stapling coin flips.

Overall I would recommend giving these a try. If you do decide to purchase Peel-n-Seal coin flips, it would help support my site if you use my Amazon Affiliate link, the small advertising revenue allows me to continue writing reviews and informational articles on American Coin Stash.

Click here to be redirected to Amazon >>


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Why is the Susan B. Anthony Coin So Poorly Designed?

The Susan B. Anthony dollar coin is without a doubt one of the most interesting pieces of US coinage. This coin is widely regarded as being one of the least attractive coins ever made by the U.S. Mint, but along the way there were many times the design could have been fixed but was not.

Size

Before the Susan B Anthony dollar, the US Mint was making large dollar coins that were 38.1mm in diameter. The Mint decided to cut costs and make the coin more usable by bringing the size down to 26.5mm in diameter.

Unfortunately, the 26.5mm diameter along with the gold coloring made the coin too easily mistaken for a 24.3mm quarter. This was one of the reasons the SBA dollar was not widely used.

Shape

Originally, to prevent the Susan B Anthony dollar coin from being mistaken for a quarter dollar, the Deputy Director of the U.S. Mint, Dr. Alan Goldman, planned to make the coin an 11-sided polygon.

The vending machine companies lobbied against the proposal of an 11-sided coin, however, arguing that their machines were only meant for round coins. So the mint kept the 11 sides visible on the coin, but made the coin round.

I’m not sure why the mint bothered to keep the decorative edges? I assume this was all very last minute, as the edges only clutter the coin.

Eagle Reverse

Most coins follow a theme. The person on the obverse usually has a relation to the image on the reverse of the coin. For example, Thomas Jefferson’s nickel has Monticello, his plantation. The Lincoln Penny until recently had the Lincoln memorial.

Susan B. Anthony was a woman’s rights leader who was instrumental in getting women the right to vote. Susan B Anthony died in 1906, 63 years before the moon landing.

Susan B Anthony clearly had nothing to do with the moon landing, so why is there an image of an eagle landing on the moon on the reverse of her coin?

The reverse of the eagle landing on the moon originally appeared on the Eisenhower Dollar coin from 1971-1978. As it turns out, Eisenhower was not alive during the moon landing either. He died about a year prior, and while in talk about designing an Eisenhower coin, the U.S. government decided the reverse of the coin should honor the moon landing.

Late in the design process, Utah Senator Jake Garn passed an amendment to keep the ‘Eagle has landed’ reverse. Why? I’m not sure.

Having a Woman On A Coin

Having a real woman on a U.S. coin was as controversial then as it is today. Before 1979, Lady Liberty was the only female featured on a coin. There were many different complaints about the addition of Susan B. Anthony to the dollar coin.

Some argued she wasn’t influential enough and a great many argued that she wasn’t attractive enough. (Ironic, given that Abraham Lincoln, considered one of the least attractive presidents now and in his time, is still honored on the penny and the 5$ bill.)

Granted, there was a lot of political posturing in putting a woman on a coin. Some people were in favor in order to gain more credibility with female voters.

The rush to get a female on a circulating coin paired with the rush of the U.S. Mint to produce more dollar coins is a big reason why this design is so poor. Many elements of this coin on their own are great, but as a whole the coin does not fit together.

What the designers got right:

I think the depiction of Susan B Anthony is really good, Frank Gasparro made an accurate image of Susan B Anthony. She looks regal in her portrait, and the strike is clear.

The Eagle design is also very good. The eagle landing on the moon was already in use for the much larger Eisenhower Dollar Coin, but it scaled down nicely for the SBA dollar.

I wish this had become an 11-sided coin, I am a big fan of coin shapes that deviate from the usual circle. That could have been the saving design factor that pushed the Susan B. Anthony Dollar into popularity.

What it almost was:

The original concept for the small dollar coin by Frank Gasparro is one of my favorite coin designs. I know I complain about Lady Liberty being used on a coin more than real women but I absolutely ADORE this design.

Gasparro_Liberty_obverse
Original concept for the small dollar coin by Frank Gasparro.

Lady Liberty is shown with a Phrygian Cap, a symbol of the pursuit of liberty. I like her adventurous, Grecian look in this design.

Small Dollar Coin Concept Obverse Frank Gasparro
Original concept for the small dollar coin reverse.

The obverse is a very classic design of an eagle. Although Lady Liberty and a soaring eagle are both overused symbols, in my opinion, Frank Gasparro did a fantastic job using them for this design. The design is classic and detailed without being cluttered.


Although the Susan B. Anthony coin has a lot of flaws, all of the flaws are what attract me to this coin as a coin collector. The SBA dollar is one of my favorite coins! There is so much history to just this one coin.

If you are looking to get a Susan B. Anthony dollar coin, you can get change from vending machines, or ask your local bank teller. If you are still having trouble finding a Susan B. Anthony Dollar you can buy them on Amazon or eBay. (Seriously, check with your bank first though.)

Even proof coins can be bought for cheap. Here’s a SBA coin selling on Amazon:


What do you think of the Susan B Anthony Dollar coin? Share a comment and vote in our poll!

I am an Amazon Affiliate, so I earn a commission on sales made through my links. This does not increase the price of any item linked through my site. My main goal is to inform.

Side View Flying Eagle IHP

What is a Fatty Indian Head Penny?

It’s rude to call anyone a fatty, unless you are talking about the fatty Indian Head Penny (IHP).

The fatty Indian Head Penny refers to pennies minted from 1854-1864 when the pennies had a bigger diameter and were thicker. The 1856-1858 Flying Eagle Cents are also “Fatty” pennies.

  • Fatty Cent Weight: ~4.67 grams
  • Regular Cent Weight: ~3.11 grams

I don’t own a fatty Indian Head Penny, but I do have an 1857 Flying Eagle Cent we can use for comparison.

Flying Eagle and IHP obverse
Left: 1857 “Fatty” Flying Eagle Cent, Right: 1888 Indian Head Penny.

From above it is hard to see a difference between the size two coins. The 1857 Flying Eagle Cent has the same diameter as the 1888 Indian Head Penny.

When we look from the side, however, we can really see where “fatty” cents got their name:

Fatty Flying Eagle Cent vs Indian Head Penny

The Fatty Flying Eagle Cent is about 75% thicker than the regular cent. If these coins were being renamed today we would call fatty cents “chonky cents” instead.

Here is the reverse of these two coins:

Flying Eagle IHP Reverse Indian Head Penny
Flying Eagle Cent Reverse vs Indian Head Penny Reverse

Share any comments or questions in the comments below!

Top 7 Ugliest Coins in U.S. History

The U.S. Mint has made some really gorgeous coins over the last few decades… and some incredibly ugly coins. Let’s look at the ugliest coins ever made by the U.S. Mint.

Some of these are my opinion, and others were decided by popular opinion. If you feel like a coin deserves a spot on this list, post a comment or reach out on my Contact Page.

7.) JFK Presidential Dollar (2015)

John F. Kennedy Dollar Coin

We know the U.S. Mint can make a better JFK coin, because they did it on the Kennedy half dollar. All the presidential dollar coins are boring, but this one is on the verge of unattractive.

Not the ugliest coin on this list, but my biggest issue is how sad this coin looks. JFK looking down does not give him a presidential look, but more of a forlorn, forgotten look. Coins are all about symbolism, and I wish this coin had a more hopeful aspect to it.

6.) Cincinnati Half Dollar (1936)

cincinnati half dollar commemorative
Cincinnati Half Dollar

BORING!

This must have been done by one of the laziest engravers at the U.S. Mint. There are no details on lady liberty. She looks very blobby.

Besides the lack of detail, the ugliest part of this coin is Lady Liberty’s neck. Are you okay Miss Liberty? Necks are not supposed to bend like that.

5.) Flowing Hair Half Dollar and Dime (1794-1795)

1795 flowing hair half dollar
Flowing Hair Half Dollar

I can’t judge this coin too harshly, as it is one of the first coins made by the U.S. Mint, I’m sure they were still working out the kinks in the design process.

This coin has a some intricate detailing, but several design choices that are unappealing. First, Lady Liberty’s hairline looks strange to me. Perhaps she is suffering from early balding?

My biggest issue with this design is with the Eagle. This eagle looks more like a starving plucked chicken or a vulture than a powerful eagle. The head is way too small.

4.) Three Cent Silver (1851-1873)

Three Cent Silver Coin

Gosh, this coin is weird. It doesn’t resemble any other U.S. coinage, so I give the Mint points for bravery here.

The obverse reminds me of a sheriffs badge, and the reverse reminds me of a witches spell book. Most of the imagery makes sense, except for the large “C” on the reverse which I have yet to see an explanation for.

This coin was not popular in its time, nor is it popular for coin collectors today.

3.) Effigy Mounds Quarter (2017)

2017 d effigy mounds national monument quarter
Effigy Mounds Quarter

The Effigy Mounds Quarter is here due to public opinion, more than my own. Many coin collectors don’t like this quarter because the effigy mounds look like amorphous blobs in person.

In the picture above we can clearly see the blobs resemble animals, however in person the quarters are not as attractive once they’ve worn even slightly.

Personally, I like the effigy mounds quarter, I think the use of blank space is interesting and eye-catching, but I am in the minority with that opinion.

2.) Chain Cent (1793)

Chain Cent

The Chain Cent coin gives me the heebie-jeebies. Something is very scary about the depiction of Lady Liberty in the Chain Cent. She looks more like a body-less ghost floating around a haunted mansion than a symbol of strength.

The reverse is equally unappealing. I assume the chains are meant to signify unity, but it reads are more restricting and dystopian.

The shortening of “AMERICA” to “AMERI.” is also a strange choice, there is so much blank space on the reverse, there was easily room for the whole word.

I did not give this coin the number one spot on the list simply because it is a very early U.S. coinage.

1.) Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coin (1979-1999)

1979 Susan B Anthony Dollar
Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coin

So much went wrong in designing the Susan B. Anthony dollar coin. There was interference from lobbyists, outdated laws, and public interest groups all working together to make this one of the ugliest U.S. coins.

On its own, this coin has some really attractive elements. The eagle landing on the moon is one of my favorite coin reverses. But what does the moon landing have to do with Susan B. Anthony? Nothing.

The U.S. Mint wanted to design a coin that was not a perfect square, but vending machine lobbyists interfered because it would be more difficult to use in a vending machine. Instead of scrapping that idea, the mint left in the hexagonal edges.

I know several people don’t like this coin because they think Susan B. Anthony looks too ugly, and that is a silly argument. We don’t put people on coins because they are attractive, we put them on our coinage because they were influential and inspiring. Abraham Lincoln is on the penny, but he was widely regarded as being unattractive for his time.

I like this coin for the lore around why it has so many different elements, but ultimately it is the ugliest coin due to the lack of a coherent theme.


What did you think about this list? Anything you would have changed? Share a comment below!

Decision Coin YES/NO Medallion Challenge Coin

Decision Making Token Review: Let A Coin Decide Your Fate

While browsing the internet recently, I found a really useful kind of exonumia (tokens): the decision coin! These tokens are meant to be flipped and will land on a side to help you make a decision.

Usually, the coin gives a “yes” or “no” side, but some of the decision coins get more creative. Here is a comparison of 6 different decision challenge coins.

The Classic Yes/No

This one has a very classic and simple design. The makers did a good job on the weight and diameter.

At 39mm in diameter, it is about the size of a silver dollar, but weighs .634 ounces. This means it will have a good weight for holding, but still be easy to flip.

I like this decision coin’s construction a lot, even though the design is a bit boring.

The Gothic Design

I love the design on this coin, especially the “yes” side. It’s a very gothic look with nice detail in the design.

This challenge coin comes in two colors: silver or bronze. The silver looks better, but weighs 1.37 ounces. A 1.37 ounce coin would be difficult for me to flip smoothly on my thumb. (It is not real silver, just silver colored.)

The bronze is a better weight at .81 ounces, but some customers have complained that the bronze is darker in person.

The Pirate Token

I’m not a fan of this coin’s design. The “YES” and “NO” font looks a bit tacky to me. Plus, there is no coherent theme. This coin is a strange mix of gothic and pirate and I’m not a fan of it.

Other than the design, this coin is by the same maker that did the two previous coins, so I have no qualms with the quality of it.

Go To Bed Coin

This design is so cute! I like the risk the designer took in making a coin for a very specific occasion.

The sheep on the back of the coin are adorable (although the feet freak me out). There are a lot of small details that really bring this coin together and make it a great gift for the bookworm in your life.

In the product description it says, “Coins are struck in the USA using antique machinery and traditional coining techniques.” So they get points for that! A lot of thought went into these coins.

At 35mm and 12 grams, I’d say it is a good weight and size for flipping in your hand. My one issue with this coin is that copper has a very distinct smell that can transfer to your hand.

If you are more of a binger than a bookworm, then this is the decision coin for you:

The Crude Coin

This coin is better for decisions with your drinking buddies than making decisions at work.

I like the design, it was really creative to have the palm in different directions for each side. The “ZFG” diamond logo also has a “H” for heads and a “T” for tails engraved in it which is a nice touch.

This is another coin of 39mm diameter and .81 ounces. This is a good coin for flipping.

The Simple Charm

This little charm is very cute. This would be a good decision coin for young kids, especially since it is about 25.4mm in diameter (the size of a quarter) it would be easy for a child to flip.

Practically, I’m suspicious of this coin being evenly weighted since it is handcrafted pewter. If you want a coin that you are sure is giving 50/50 odds of yes or no, then I would avoid this coin.


Anything else to add? Share a comment and vote in our poll below!

I am an Amazon Affiliate, so I earn a commission on sales made through my links. This does not increase the price of any item linked through my site. My main goal is to inform.

How to Properly Get Coins Into Whitman Coin Folders

If you have tried to complete a Whitman folder, then you know how hard it can be to fit coins into their respective slots. Some coins slide in easily, while others take minutes of pushing and shoving to still be not correctly in.

One of the golden rules of handling coins is not to touch the surface of the coin and only handle a coin by holding the rim. But how do you get a coin into a folder without touching the surface?

Using cotton gloves is recommended when you do have to touch the surface of the coin. This does not help you push the coin in, but it may give you confidence to put your fingers on the surface to get more leverage.

If the problem is that you cannot get enough leverage, or the hole seems too tight. I have a hack for getting coins in a folder that has been very successful for me.

Here is the best way to get coins into a coin folder:

1.) Take out the coin that does not fit properly.

1962D Quarter not fitting in the folder.

Here is my 1962D silver quarter that will not fit properly into the album no matter how hard I try pushing with my thumb.

2.) Insert a new coin, and press it in with another object

Pressing a 2020 Quarter in to widen the hole.

I am using a 2020 Quarter to widen the hole just enough for my other quarter to fit. I used the edge of a plastic putty knife, but you can really use anything that gets you enough leverage on the coin since you don’t have to worry about damaging the surface.

A hammer, pencil, or cup would also work well to press the coin in.

Here is the 2020 quarter in a folder.

2020 Quarter temporarily in the folder.

3.) Push the new coin out of the folder.

Using my thumb to press the coin out from behind.

You can use your thumb on the back of the folder to gently push the coin out of its position. Try not to bend the cardboard during this part, just push the thin paper section behind the coin.

4.) Put the correct coin in.

1962D Quarter in a Whitman folder.

Now I was able to put the correct 1962D Quarter in its slot with less force. Test how secure the coin is by flipping the folder upside-down and giving it a shake.


It may seem silly to put so much thought into coins going into a Whitman folder, more often than not, Whitman folder coins will not be your best coins. If you want to prevent damage it should be in an Air-Tite container.


If folders are too difficult for you, you can get a Whitman coin album. The albums have a clear plastic surface that you pull back, and then drop the coin in. The other benefit of an album over a folder is that you can see the front and back of the coins.

The Inside Of A Franklin Half Dollar Album

Share a comment below with any other tips or tricks you may have. Remember to vote in the poll below!


I am an Amazon Affiliate, so I earn a commission on sales made through my links. This does not increase the price of any item linked through my site. My main goal is to inform.